A Detailed Guide to Advanced Search Operators for SEO

detailed-guide-seo

First things first, Google gets as much as about 78% of worldwide search volume, which makes it the biggest source of organic traffic. Perhaps so much so that you wouldn’t even want to bother with another search engine in most cases.

However, over the past few years, Google has gotten extremely stringent with SEO. If you’re aware of the recent SEO trends, you likely know that Google is penalizing sites with shady SEO practices more aggressively than ever before.

This certainly calls for some quality and well-thought-out SEO strategies, as those typical SEO tools are no longer going to cut it. So without further ado, let’s walk you through some highly advanced search operators that may turn out to be extremely useful in coming up with sophisticated SEO strategies that are both safe and efficient.

Advanced Search Operators

Allinanchor: This search operator is going to pull up all pages that are linking out to sites using a particular anchor text. For example, “all in anchor: Best SEO Company” is going to return pages that are linking out to sites using the words “best SEO company” as the anchor text.

Allintext: This is something you can use to find pages that contain particular words in their text. For instance, searching for “allintext: SEO checklist” is going to get you results that include the words “SEO” and “list.”

Allintitle: Similar to the above one, this search operator would return pages that have particular words in their title.

Allinurl: This will help you find URLs containing particular words.

Author: Google will only show you results from Google Groups that are newsgroup articles written by the author you’re searching for.

Define: This search operator is similar to the above one but would help you get definitions for what you’re searching for.

Intext: This is related to “allintext,” but has a slightly different use. For example, if you search for “Rand Fishkin intext: SEO” (without the quotes), then you would get results that mention SEO in the text, but “Rand” and “Fishkin” may not necessarily be referred to in the text.

Intitle: Similar to the above search operator, this helps you find results with specific words in the title, while the other words that you do not put after the search operator may be mentioned anywhere in the article.

Site: This search operator would allow you to restrict the search results to only the site you put after it. Example: “SEO tips site:getplusfollowers.com” (without the quotes) would only get you results that talk about social media tips from getplusfollowers.com.

Inurl: It works the same way as intext and intitle do, pulling up results that contain particular words in the URL while the other words that are not put after the search operator can be anywhere in the article.

Link: This search operator will only return all pages that link to a particular site. However, if you’re trying to find the external links to a site, you can use the “minus” search operator along with the “link” one.

For example, if you search for “link:google.com -site:google.com” (without the quotes), you would only get external pages linking to google.com, and not the ones from Google’s site.

Finding Link Building Opportunities

The beauty of these search operators is that they make it incredibly easier and efficient to find great link building opportunities, which can otherwise be very time-consuming and a downright tedious task. The infographic talks in great detail about how you can go about using these search operators to find link building opportunities.

Advanced Google Search Operators
Created by SEO Optimizers


brandon-gpBrandon Leibowitz, owner of SEO Optimizers, has been involved with digital marketing since 2007 with an emphasis on search engine optimization. He runs a sports blog as well called shralpin.com. His knowledge and advice has helped countless people improve their online presence.