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Interesting Facts about Google’s Algorithms

google-algorithm
Google makes use of algorithms for determining website rankings on search results. Whenever someone is searching for something on Google, the algorithms will be swinging into action. They would be reviewing trillions of pages for locating the precise information for the searcher. They would be completing the entire filtering exercise for you in just a few seconds.

In this context, you must understand that algorithms do not merely read the specific web page content before deciding if it actually answers your query, they would be checking how recently the information has been posted, if there is any possibility of being spam and also, if the location seems to be relevant to the searcher.

All these factors are crucial if you are attempting to rank the website. If you want your SEO campaign to succeed, you need to fully understand the working of Google algorithms. Understanding the role of Google algorithms is the key to SEO success. Here are a few facts about Google’s algorithms.

hummingbird-google

Hummingbird Is the Name for Google’s Overall Algorithm

Google’s overall algorithm seems to be having one and only name ever since Hummingbird was introduced in 2013. If you have been keeping track of all the Google’s algorithm changes, you must have noticed some truly colorful names that have been assigned to them such as the Penguin, Panda, and Pigeon and many such names.

But all those names were meant for the updates to the algorithm that is referred to as the Hummingbird, today. Hummingbird was created for making search results on Google faster and more precise.

Search Engine Land has come up with a wonderful analogy while describing Hummingbird, the overall algorithm. According to SEL, Hummingbird is supposed to be a recipe that has hundreds of ingredients. All these diverse ingredients would be put together by Hummingbird to determine the efficacy and quality of trillions of pages existing on the Internet and how effective any one of those pages would be for answering your precise search.

Algorithm Modifications Take Place Over 500 Times in a Year

You may only be aware of just a few Google updates taking place every year. But in reality, you would be astounded to learn that there are over 500 changes made to the overall Google algorithm every year. As per the statement released by MOZ, the hot favorite SEO community, Google actually makes over 500 changes to its algorithm during the course of the year. And these modifications would be including numerous minor changes which mostly remain unknown or unheard of, to most of you.

Why does Google introduce so many changes? It does so to respond to the demands of a rapidly expanding Google user base. To cater to the needs of this vast and diverse user base, Google comes up with numerous algorithm changes frequently. Hire the professional services of any reputed SEO company for effective SEO solutions.

The Secret behind Google Dance

You must have heard about Google Dance. If you do not know anything about it, first of all, you should understand that it does not involve any dance as such. This was a term used for referring to sudden changes in SERP rankings. The term was originally coined by WebmasterWorld and it went on to assign geographically-inspired terms such as Boston dance in February 2003 and even Florida Dance in the same year. However, Florida was supposed to be the last noticeable dance in 20003. It is at the end of the year 2003 that Google consciously quit making significant updates to the algorithms each and every month.

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Page-Rank Derived Its Name from Google Co-Founder Larry Page

Page-Rank was introduced for determining the importance of a specific web page with emphasis on both quality and quantity of links. In Search Engine Optimization, the websites having a relatively high page ranking would be selected by webmasters for link building. This technology came to be named after Larry Page, Google’s Co-Founder.

Conclusion: The Human Touch & Human Intervention

It would be wrong to assume that Google is 100% dependent on technology for determining the quality and efficacy of search engine. There is clear evidence of the human touch. Google is known to have hired human specialists or evaluators for determining the quality and efficacy of results for diverse searches. The search experts would be following some specific guidelines. These effective guidelines are explored by digital marketing specialists for discovering important elements for maintaining search quality.
Algorithms could be real fun. However, with such a colorful history behind it, there is surely more drama coming up.



Sujain Thomas is a freelancer, blogger, and most importantly SEO specialist attached to a private SEO company of repute in Boston. She is an avid blogger and a source of inspiration and authority for budding
SEO experts.

 

A Detailed Guide to Advanced Search Operators for SEO

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First things first, Google gets as much as about 78% of worldwide search volume, which makes it the biggest source of organic traffic. Perhaps so much so that you wouldn’t even want to bother with another search engine in most cases.

However, over the past few years, Google has gotten extremely stringent with SEO. If you’re aware of the recent SEO trends, you likely know that Google is penalizing sites with shady SEO practices more aggressively than ever before.

This certainly calls for some quality and well-thought-out SEO strategies, as those typical SEO tools are no longer going to cut it. So without further ado, let’s walk you through some highly advanced search operators that may turn out to be extremely useful in coming up with sophisticated SEO strategies that are both safe and efficient.

Advanced Search Operators

Allinanchor: This search operator is going to pull up all pages that are linking out to sites using a particular anchor text. For example, “all in anchor: Best SEO Company” is going to return pages that are linking out to sites using the words “best SEO company” as the anchor text.

Allintext: This is something you can use to find pages that contain particular words in their text. For instance, searching for “allintext: SEO checklist” is going to get you results that include the words “SEO” and “list.”

Allintitle: Similar to the above one, this search operator would return pages that have particular words in their title.

Allinurl: This will help you find URLs containing particular words.

Author: Google will only show you results from Google Groups that are newsgroup articles written by the author you’re searching for.

Define: This search operator is similar to the above one but would help you get definitions for what you’re searching for.

Intext: This is related to “allintext,” but has a slightly different use. For example, if you search for “Rand Fishkin intext: SEO” (without the quotes), then you would get results that mention SEO in the text, but “Rand” and “Fishkin” may not necessarily be referred to in the text.

Intitle: Similar to the above search operator, this helps you find results with specific words in the title, while the other words that you do not put after the search operator may be mentioned anywhere in the article.

Site: This search operator would allow you to restrict the search results to only the site you put after it. Example: “SEO tips site:getplusfollowers.com” (without the quotes) would only get you results that talk about social media tips from getplusfollowers.com.

Inurl: It works the same way as intext and intitle do, pulling up results that contain particular words in the URL while the other words that are not put after the search operator can be anywhere in the article.

Link: This search operator will only return all pages that link to a particular site. However, if you’re trying to find the external links to a site, you can use the “minus” search operator along with the “link” one.

For example, if you search for “link:google.com -site:google.com” (without the quotes), you would only get external pages linking to google.com, and not the ones from Google’s site.

Finding Link Building Opportunities

The beauty of these search operators is that they make it incredibly easier and efficient to find great link building opportunities, which can otherwise be very time-consuming and a downright tedious task. The infographic talks in great detail about how you can go about using these search operators to find link building opportunities.

Advanced Google Search Operators
Created by SEO Optimizers


brandon-gpBrandon Leibowitz, owner of SEO Optimizers, has been involved with digital marketing since 2007 with an emphasis on search engine optimization. He runs a sports blog as well called shralpin.com. His knowledge and advice has helped countless people improve their online presence.

New Report Says Websites Are Unlikely to Rank Without Links

Being in the SEO game at Coronation I.M. we hear Google and others telling us that we should stop building links to websites in order to help them rank better. Or we have others from “fairy world” telling us:

“If you build great content, others will share and link to your content and you will get better rankings.”

Really? Would you really find content from a plumber or an insurance salesman something that you would share on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest? How about writing a blog post about the new coverage options for home insurance and sharing the link on your website or blog? I didn’t think so.

Moz’s scientist, Dr. Matthew Peters has discovered new data from the soon to be released biannual ranking correlation study performed by Moz. Their study found that websites ranking for competitive terms had at least one link pointing at them and the majority had a lot more links.

In a recent blog post titled “Can You Rank in Google Without Links? New Data Says Slim Chance” by Cyrus Shepherd on Moz stated:

When we look at what the study found about links, we find a strong relationship.

The correlation between higher rankings and the number of linking websites (root domains) sits at .30. This number seems small, but it’s actually one of the highest correlations the study found. (Smaller correlations are also not surprising—with over 200 ranking signals, Google specifically designed their algorithm so that one factor doesn’t dominate the others.)

Even more telling is the number of websites we found in the top results that had external backlinks, or rather, the lack thereof.

Out of the top results, a full 99.2% of all websites had at least one external link. (The remaining .8% is well within the margin of error expected between Mozscape and Google’s own link index.) The study found almost no websites ranking for competitive search phrases that didn’t have at least a single external link pointing at them, and most had significantly more links.

[read more]

Let’s be clear about links though. More is not necessarily better. Links from higher quality sites have a far better effect on rankings than a large quantity of low quality links. Plus, you will likely avoid being penalized by Google using this method.

The other thing to take into account is that links alone won’t get you high rankings. You still need good content (I didn’t say great) on your website. We are also seeing good results from pages with more than 1,000 words of content with quality links pointed at those pages.

The Duplicate Content Penalty From Google Is a Myth

For years us SEO types have believed there is a penalty if your site contains duplicate content. Essentially this is content you’ve copied from another site to put on your site. Some people refer to this is as “plagiarism”. I’m not a judge, but I’ll leave that up to you. Nevertheless, it is not a penalty but rather a filter.

Your site will not be penalized if you have duplicate content on a page and it won’t have any bearing on the rest of the pages on your site. But, if you have a page of content that you’ve taken from another site about “green gizmos”, your site will not rank for “green gizmos” because it was first published on another site.

Jennifer Slegg of the SEM Post said in a recent blog post titled “There is No Duplicate Content Penalty“:

Even though duplicate content is not technically a penalty, it is referred to as such because it does act similarly to a penalty because it will not rank duplicate search results unless a searcher clicks on the link at the bottom showing “display search results similar to the pages shown above”. [ read more ]

The duplicate content filter does not apply to local search engine optimization. As an example, if you are a DUI lawyer in the Los Angeles area and you want to be found for “Los Angeles DUI lawyer”, “Riverside DUI lawyer” or even “Orange County DUI” lawyer you can publish multiple pages with exactly the same content targeting those locations. You need to change the page title, headings, and content so that it refers to the area you are marketing to. I’ve seen this method work on a number of websites.

Google Announces Doorway Page Algorithm Adjustment

Google has made another announcement targeting “doorway” pages this time. These are pages specifically created for spamming the search engine results page for targeted keywords for the purpose of sending visitors to a different page.

Personally, I like that Google is now announcing their algorithm changes. Recently, Google announced that they were changing their algorithm on April 21, 2015 to include a ranking signal for mobile-friendly websites. Hopefully these announcements keep happening as we don’t have to guess when an algorithm change has been made. Over the past few years they have updated their algorithm and we’ve all had to guess what the change was.

To find out more about what doorway pages are, read the article below:

Google Just Announced Another New Ranking Adjustment

This one is about doorway pages

By Chris Crum – March 16, 2015

Google just announced that it is cracking down on doorway pages with a new ranking adjustment, which will launch soon.

Do you think doorways pages have been a noticeable problem in search results? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Doorway pages have historically been known as pages created specifically to get in search results for various queries, and then send users to a different page.

This practice has long been against Google’s quality guidelines, but that’s hardly stopped people from trying it. In 2005, Google’s Matt Cutts advised people not to hire an “assclown SEO that makes doorway pages with sneaky redirects,” and that advice still holds up today, apparently more than ever.

Five years ago, Google started sending webmasters messages when Webmaster Tools detected doorway pages on their sites.

[read more]

What is HTTPS/SSL Encryption & Will It Boost My Google Search Rankings?

Security has always been a top priority for Google. Over the years, the company has invested a lot in ensuring that their services use industry leading security such as strong HTTPS encryption by default. This means that anyone using Google’s services like Search, Google Drive and Gmail automatically have a secure connection to Google’s servers. But beyond their products, Google’s ultimate aim is to make the internet a safer place for users, especially those using its search engine. On august 8th, 2014, Google announced that they will be using website security as a ranking signal. This means that websites that use HTTPS/SSL encryption are going to ranker higher in Google’s search engine. The signal is quite weak at the moment – affecting less than 1% of global queries – but Google did mention that the signal may be strengthened over time to give noncompliant websites time to switch to HTTPS/SSL security. The change is designed to promote online security by encouraging webmasters to implement SSL/TLS to encrypt website traffic. While most major websites had already implemented HTTPS/SSL following Edward Snowden’s revelations of NSA snooping, the standard practice has been to implement a secure connection only at the websites log in page. Making all web connections HTTPS secure by default is the most effective defence against man in the middle attacks thus protecting surfers’ privacy all the time.

What is HTTPS/SSL?

HTTPS (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure) is the more advanced version of HTTP and is usually implemented on websites to keep ecommerce transactions secure. When a surfer visits a websites via HTTPS, the site uses a digital SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate to create a secure connection between the server and the browser. Websites with valid SSL certificate can be easily identified if the address begins with https:// as opposed to http://. Moreover, web browsers such as Firefox and chrome always display a padlock icon to indicate that the site being visited has been secured in this manner. Up until Google’s announcement, HTTPS/SSL encryption had been used by just over ten percent of all websites.

What are the SEO implications of switching to HTTPS?

Having been rolled out recently as a ranking signal, its effect is still incredibly small, and has only had an impact on less than 1% of global search queries. As it stands, running your website via HTTPS is not going to push you to the top of Google’s search results for your keywords; there are literally hundreds of other things you should be doing that would yield better results in terms of improvements in search rankings. But industry experts expect HTTPS to grow in importance over the coming years, which means that it would stand you in good stead to prepare for the inevitable mass shift to HTTPS by preparing the migration early.

What if I already have HTTPS/SSL?

Most ecommerce websites already have HTTPS/SSL encryption enabled in their checkout and login pages to protect user privacy and secure online transactions. But it is important to note that any ranking boost from HHTPS/SSL only applies to SSL enabled web pages. To reap maximum benefits, you need to make your entire domain name, all the files, and URLs SSL secure. The pages then have to be tested to ensure that users don’t get any SSL certificate errors. All videos, images and third party content have to be adapted to ensure that the page doesn’t give a security warning when accessed from a remote browser. In fact, Google recommends using the Qualys Lab tool to test SSL pages and certificates.

What are the negatives?

Done right, there are no downsides that we can absolutely confirm in regards to switching from HTTPS to SSL. While many webmasters have previously expressed concern over the lower load speed of HTTPS sites VS https, the issue has been mostly negated by Google’s work on SPDY. Furthermore, Google Webmaster Tools has been improved to support HTTPS reporting. But to get best results, it is strongly recommended to seek advice from an experienced SEO consultant or developed before making the switch from HTTP to HTTPS.

We recommend playing a wait-see-approach to implementing SSL on your site. If you are not selling products through e-commerce on your website, we would not recommend changing your website to SSL yet. Ask yourself this “When was the last time that Google said something would give you a rankings boost? Even slight?” We can’t remember one. Now this could be viewed as total conspiracy stuff, but what if Google were to set their algorithm to have a higher quality standard for sites with SSL and your site was right on the threshold for quality before going to SSL? Could this mean that your site may give a signal to Google that you are doing SEO on your site and your site ends up penalized? We don’t really know at this point. This is the main reasons why we are going to be patient and test this on a few test sites before we start recommending this to any of our clients at Coronation Internet Marketing.

Social Signals: The Search Engine Optimization Game Changer

Following the increase in cookie cutter search engine optimization tactics, Google is beginning to implement new methods in how sites are ranked. Introducing the finest in search engine optimization, social signals. Many of us are already familiar with the powers of social media, social bookmarking, and digital media for search engine optimization. However, how many of us actually realize the profound impact that social signals now have on our rankings? Today we want to shed some light on this topic and the ways you can benefit from them.

Direct Social Signals

These are signals that have a direct impact on your organic ranking. They include the number of Twitter & Facebook followers, the amount of likes you have, and number of people in your Google+ circle and the number of tweets you have. The direct impacts are quite straightforward and have been touted by many search engine optimization tutorials in the past. However, if you really want to become effective in your direct social signals, then you will want to put emphasis on the quality of your posts through substantive information

Indirect Social Signals

These are facts that come from having low bounce rates, larger unique visitor volume, positive reviews on major social media sites (Yelp, Google+) and inbound links These steps are often overlooked, which is why we want to break them down for you. Bounce rates and volume of unique visitors reflects on your brand image and how much social interaction you are likely to have based on the amount of users you are able to attract and retain. Positive news presents an example of how well your content and data is received by the social media community, hence your customers. Google expects you to answer tweets and overall ability of building relationships with people. Inbound links are a major driver of your brand visibility in terms of increasing your Internet footprint and impact. The more that you can be found the better that you will be ranked on Google’s search engine optimization and overall a better perception. Increasing the amount of links you have on reputable sites is a great step towards this direction

The Importance of Social Signals in Search Engine Optimization

The new generation is growing up with social media and as a result it will be a major market looking outwards. People are likely to visit your site more on personal recommendations versus a robot generated search engine optimization technique. Social presence garners a better reputation and loyalty leading to more sales for you and higher rankings in Google’s esteem.

Implementation

Onsite include buttons for Facebook likes, sharing and blogs including places like LinkedIn, Twitter and etc. Create links to your Facebook page, Google+ page, LinkedIn, guest blogs, Pinterest and etc. Registering your company or blogs page on Google+ and Facebook will be a step in the right direction for this.

We hope this article gives you a better idea of how take advantage of social signals for search engine optimization. Feel free to contact Coronation Internet Marketing about our SEO services if you have any questions about how social signals can help your search engine rankings.